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Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 18 7:41 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

I have never seen an earth star; not sure if that is because we don't get them round here, or I just haven't noticed them. Thanks for showing it.

We have a peregrine round here at the moment, or did have a week or so ago. It killed two pigeons in our garden that it dropped; had the breasts from one, but the other was a bit torn so didn't fancy it. The rooks are not on the nearby pylon, but seem to have decamped to the next one, and the pigeons are currently flying low.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3345
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

On the 5th I didn't go out. On the 12th we had a walk in a soggy, squelchy wood, and it was very grey and I didn't see anything I wanted to photograph. On the 19th we went to an area of woodland and flooded gravel pits, It was very cold with a biting wind and I didn't feel like taking my gloves off to photograph anything! I didn't see the two Kingfishers (looking the wrong way), I didn't see the Long-tailed Tits building their nest (couldn't see through the bramble thicket (and the heads in the way)). I didn't see the Treecreepers (didn't find the answer to my question "Where is it?" of "On that tree." very helpful when we were standing surrounded by trees) and I didn't see the Great Spotted Woodpecker at the top of the tall tree because my neck didn't want to crane that far and anyway I can see GSWs any day on the peanut feeder outside the window at home.

Yesterday we had an altogether better walk - no wind, bright sunshine and I saw the Chiff-Chaff even though he was at the top of a tall Birch, singing his little heart out. We found some more Scarlet Elf Cups, another new site. The bees (Bumble and Honey) werfe enjoying the catkins on the Pussy Willow (probably Salix caprea).

A few birds on the ponds including this Coot (Fulica atra) looking remarkably silvery in the sunshine:


.

We also found these holes bored in a willow stump. They are about the diameter of my little finger, and probably made by the larvae of the Goat Moth:




Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 18 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sounds an interesting walk. I have found what I think are scarlet elf cap in the wood, but need to check the ID. Looking lovely and bright at this time of year when even the bramble leaves have pretty well given up because of the weather.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3345
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 18 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Scarlet Elf Cup is a fairly unmistakable fungus, except that you need a microscope to tell the difference between species coccinea and species austriaca.

Actually Mr Mycology told us on Monday that they are now saying there might be five different species, not two!

A photograph should clinch the I.D. as far as 'one of the Scarlet Elf Cups'.

Henry

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6037
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 18 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Was your heart really in your walk Buzzy?

Glad you've posted, I was getting a little worried that you were unwell.

Looking forward to more pictures now.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 18 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have just been a bit too busy to do a proper ID. I will try to look it up this weekend.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3345
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 18 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

No walk last week, especially with it being so wet, but this week we ventured out to an area of woodland, which we reached by driving through the rain to dry weather!

Several nice plants, including Yellow Star of Bethlehem (Gagea lutea)




which is not a common plant in our area, though possibly overlooked.

We also found more Scarlet Elf Cups, which seem to be popping up everywhere we go this year.

Some nice birds, including Coal Tits (as well as Blue and Great Tits),
Blackcaps, Chiff-Chaffs and Willow Warblers, and, a great surprise, a single snatch of song from a Nightingale. We waited a while, but he did not reprise!

Henry

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3345
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 18 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Also found a couple of flower spikes of Toothwort (Lathraea squamaria), another plant that is not very common in our area but may be overlooked because of its short flowering period, and since it is a parasite, has no leaves or stems to show its presence outside the flowering season.




Henry

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33857
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 18 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nice finds both are rare to missing up here. i have seen toothwort further south ,odd wee plant.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 18 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't know the yellow star of Bethlehem, but we have loads of toothwort coming up in the woods. Son found some in the coup we are cutting that we weren't aware of before, and it is coming up well in all the usual places. There are also a few twayblade, the other oddity of our woods coming up, but not too much yet. Have seen the first early dog violets too.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6037
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 18 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nice pictures Buzzy. Two flowers I've never seen before. I've never even heard of toothwort.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 18 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It is a parasite on several trees Sgt. Colon, as Buzzy said. It is said to grow on the roots of elm, but they are pretty unusual now, so it uses other things such as hazel. I think it is also on the roots of ash in our wood, although it isn't supposed to be, but always very hard to tell when all the trees are mixed up.

Have just looked up yellow star of Bethlehem, and see that it might be confused with lesser celandine. I must look more closely, as we have the right soil conditions for it, although I am not aware of it ever being seen in our wood.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5212
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 18 6:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lesser celandine is a pretty nasty invasive over here.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6037
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 18 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks for that MR. Somethings to look out for the next time I'm strolling through the woods.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9738

PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 18 6:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lesser celandine can be a pain here too Slim, but it usually grows naturally where it has competition, is shaded out by other things, and naturally kept in check. I have heard that trying to get rid of it from gardens is virtually impossible though.

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