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Does anyone use a woodburning Rayburn ?
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RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8428
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 10 2:59 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Well a hole would be a start & them some method of making it air tight again.

The lower door has a cast hole (with a bar across with a threaded hole in for the wheel) that has a raised lip that is then machined to a flat surface for the wheel to mount on.


It need the raised lip cos the door is not flat. Trouble is with heating the cast door it could crack or warp and not seal to the front panel.

Might be best to have the hole cut & then a box frame made up to mate to the door via bolts to sort the air control out.

Or get a new door made, either a cast one made in the style of the lower door or a thick steel plate one & add a door seal rope.

KiwiTussock



Joined: 28 Nov 2012
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 12 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I repair & rebuild Rayburn's here in NZ. SOme one asked if they could leave door open to gain more heat. I would strongly suggest NO!
And cutting the Fire door to allow it to open with the Ash pit door closed is not advisable. These are cookers and are generally used for home heating using radiators and cooking food on top as well as in ovens. Top oven gets hot but the lower oven is really just like a warming draw where one can raise bread or keep tucker warm for later.
For someone who wanted to burn wood instead of coal, there is a different grate available for Royal's and indeed we make up a grate for #3 Rayburn as well. You will get more heat from burning coal but wood can often be gotten for free so having it multi fueled is in my view an asset.
These are a wonderful home asset but if you want quick heat and if you are in a house where two go out to work, it probably is not what one would want for now. I'd still recommend not taking it out though. They save heaps when heating hot water, radiators and giving a nice ambient temperature. But then.... I DO HAVE a bias. I work with them.
By the way, keep your bricks up to spec. They will crap out big time if they don't have ALL the firebricks in place.
If they take too long to get to the heat needed to cook with, (especially in the oven), check the oven edges are still sealed with refractory cement. If the cooker smokes from under the hob or anywhere, the top will need to come off and refractory cement needs to be replaced. They DO NOT SMOKE and DO GIVE good temps if the sealing is ok.
HANG IN THERE and give it some possibly needed maintenance.
ttfn

smudgesmumzie



Joined: 25 Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Location: north wales
PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 13 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have a woodburning Rayburn would I be able to burn coke in it as just burning wood in this cold spell doesnt seem to get hot enough

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 13 5:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

smudgesmumzie wrote:
I have a woodburning Rayburn would I be able to burn coke in it as just burning wood in this cold spell doesnt seem to get hot enough

Yes.
& welcome to Downsizer.

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8428
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 13 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If it is a wood only Rayburn & not a SFW then no.

Will also depend on which grate it has fitted, some are for wood only.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 13 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

RichardW wrote:
If it is a wood only Rayburn & not a SFW then no.

Will also depend on which grate it has fitted, some are for wood only.

Didn't know they made wood specific models now.
Although from their website the 300w appears to have
Quote:
additional flat grate baffle plates that increase the area of the grate suited specifically for burning wood.

Which to me infers they are removable.
My experiences are only with the older models which IMHO will burn virtually anything combustible.

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8428
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 13 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The grate is not the only difference. The air still goes in via the wheel but there are internal plates that channel it to above the grate to give the wood its top air that it burns better with.

smudgesmumzie



Joined: 25 Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Location: north wales
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 13 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

thank you for the warm welcome and answers
does anyone know the visible difference between the Heatranger 345
and the 355 I bought mine second hand some time ago as I have been renovating a house and only just got round to plumbing the Rayburn in,now ive actually looked at the users guide I have got 2! one for the 345 and 1 for the 355 I know ones for solid fuel and wood and the others for wood only.Im so confuzzled

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8428
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 13 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What does the grate look like?

Riddle bars or a wheel & its an SFW

Flat plate with holes in & its a W, will also have Stainless Steel air guides in the lower ash box area directing the air to above the plate.

Drumist



Joined: 27 Jan 2013
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 13 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi All

This has been a really useful thread for me as we are just considering the possibility of a wood burning Rayburn in the kitchen.

I understand there are some issues with UK building regs, in that you are not allowed to install a wood burning stove in a room with an extractor, and kitchens have to have an extractor!

Do any of you know how to get around this, or are Rayburns classed differently to normal stoves?

smudgesmumzie



Joined: 25 Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Location: north wales
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 13 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thank you so much Richard. I have riddle bars so i must have a sfw.
thats great news as I can now burn wood and coke etc.

nickofthewoods



Joined: 25 Sep 2012
Posts: 59
Location: South West Wales
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 13 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Have my back to the side of a rayburn royale as I write..heats our home,our water and baking our bread soon.All fired on well seasoned birch and hazel.Loved it for the 20 years we have had it.

A word of warning to anyone re converting back from oil to wood..because of the dramatic price in oil a lot of people are doing this....in the first case one neighbour had a chimney fire immediately from the build up of deposits in the chimney...in the second and worse case..due to unknown reasons..possibly some leaked oil in the stove's rockwool insulation..friends lost their home to a fire on the first burn of a re converted rayburn.

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8428
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 13 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Also worth checking is the flue pipe. The type used for oil burners is often Ali or at best a low grade stainless steel. Burning wood requires a high grade stainless steel.

smudgesmumzie



Joined: 25 Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Location: north wales
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 13 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nickofthewoods wrote:
Have my back to the side of a rayburn royale as I write..heats our home,our water and baking our bread soon.All fired on well seasoned birch and hazel.Loved it for the 20 years we have had it.

A word of warning to anyone re converting back from oil to wood..because of the dramatic price in oil a lot of people are doing this....in the first case one neighbour had a chimney fire immediately from the build up of deposits in the chimney...in the second and worse case..due to unknown reasons..possibly some leaked oil in the stove's rockwool insulation..friends lost their home to a fire on the first burn of a re converted rayburn.

when we first tested our Rayburn we noticed some smoke coming out of the side we undid the side panel and noticed the rockwool was on fire!!!there was some kind of oil filled thermostat? leaking oil and this had caught fire! thank goodness we were both there

lornfile



Joined: 13 Feb 2018
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 18 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Almost all closed ovens are designed to be run with the fire-door closed. You should not attempt to run them with the door open, due to emission of fumes. (Even re-fuelling emits some fumes.) So please don't!

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